Small Business Accounting

What is Statutory Sick Pay?

By

Chris Andreou

What is Statutory Sick Pay? guide

Contents

Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) is the amount of money mandated by law that every employee must be paid if they are too sick to work. Employees have to meet certain eligibility criteria to qualify for SSP.

Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) is a type of government-funded financial support available to employees in the UK who are unable to work due to illness or injury. It is paid to employees who meet the eligibility criteria and is paid at a flat rate for up to 28 weeks. It is designed to help employees who are unable to work due to illness or injury to cover their basic living costs.

SSP is a legal requirement for all employers in the UK who have employees who are eligible for the scheme. It is important for employers to be aware of their legal obligations when it comes to SSP, as failure to comply with the legislation can result in hefty fines.

Who is Eligible for SSP?

In order to be eligible for SSP, an employee must meet the following criteria:

  • They must be employed and have done some work for their employer.
  • They must have been ill or injured for at least four days in a row (including non-working days).
  • They must earn at least the Lower Earnings Limit (LEL) for National Insurance contributions, which is currently £120 per week.
  • They must have been employed by their employer for at least two weeks.
  • They must have provided their employer with a fit note from their doctor.

If an employee meets all of these criteria, then they will be eligible to receive SSP.

How Much is SSP?

SSP is paid at a flat rate of £95.85 per week for up to 28 weeks. This rate is reviewed each year in April and is subject to change.

What are the Employer’s Obligations?

It is the employer’s responsibility to ensure that they are aware of their legal obligations when it comes to SSP. Employers must keep records of any SSP payments they make and must ensure that employees are aware of their rights to SSP.

Employers must also inform HMRC of any SSP payments they make and must pay the SSP to their employees within three days of the start of the employee’s period of illness or injury.

Employers must also ensure that they are paying the correct amount of SSP. If an employee is eligible for SSP, but the employer is not paying the correct amount, then the employee can make a complaint to HMRC.

What is the Process for Claiming SSP?

If an employee is unable to work due to illness or injury, then they must inform their employer as soon as possible. The employee must then provide their employer with a fit note from their doctor, which confirms that they are unable to work due to their illness or injury.

The employer must then assess the employee’s eligibility for SSP and must inform HMRC of any payments they make. The employee must then be paid the SSP within three days of the start of their period of illness or injury.

Conclusion

Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) is a type of government-funded financial support available to employees in the UK who are unable to work due to illness or injury. It is important for employers to be aware of their legal obligations when it comes to SSP, as failure to comply with the legislation can result in hefty fines. In order to be eligible for SSP, an employee must meet certain criteria and SSP is paid at a flat rate of £95.85 per week for up to 28 weeks. Employers must keep records of any SSP payments they make and must ensure that employees are aware of their rights to SSP. If an employee is unable to work due to illness or injury, then they must inform their employer and provide them with a fit note from their doctor. The employer must then assess the employee’s eligibility for SSP and must inform HMRC of any payments they make.

<p>Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) is the amount of money mandated by law that every employee must be paid if they are too sick to work. Employees have to meet certain eligibility criteria to qualify for SSP.</p>

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