How do I pay an employee?

Jordan Macey

September 3, 2021

How do I pay an employee? guide
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Small Business Accounting

If you're paying an employee for the first time, you'll need to set up payroll. You need to take the following steps:

  1. Register as an employer with HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) and get a login for PAYE Online.
  2. Choose payroll software to record employee’s details, calculate pay and deductions, and report to HMRC.
  3. Collect and keep records.
  4. Tell HMRC about your employees.
  5. Record pay, make deductions and report to HMRC on or before the first payday.
  6. Pay HMRC the tax and National Insurance you owe.

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How do I repay a Director's loan account? Guide

How do I repay a Director's loan account?

There are various ways to repay a director's loan.

  • Dividend: A dividend can be declared, and the money can be used to pay off the loan instead of being transferred to the director's personal account.
  • Cash repayment: A repayment is made by transferring money into the company account.
  • Expenses or salary: The loan can be paid off using other money to the director, such as the director's salary or expense reimbursements.
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How to calculate holiday pay for overtime and commission payments Guide

How to calculate holiday pay for overtime and commission payments

"What are the rules around holiday pay?" is a common question often asked by employers.

It can be confusing, as regulatory changes mean that employers now need to consider additional elements when working out an employee's holiday pay.

Simply put, employers now need to include regular commission and regular overtime payments when calculating an employee's or worker's holiday pay.

This is explained in further detail below:

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When can I pay myself as a Limited Company Director? Guide

When can I pay myself as a Limited Company Director?

As a limited company director, you may pay yourself through taking a salary and drawing dividends.

Salaries are typically paid out monthly. While dividends can be drawn at any frequency across the year-as long as there are sufficient distributable profits-payments are typically made on a monthly or quarterly basis.


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How do I pay a Contractor? Guide

How do I pay a Contractor?

You can pay an independent contractor by an hourly or daily rate, or by the project through the contractor's preferred payment method. You won't need to withhold taxes, as they are responsible for paying their own income and National Insurance contributions.

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What is a PAYE scheme? Guide

What is a PAYE scheme?

PAYE-or Pay As You Earn-is a system of income tax withholding by employers.

Tax and National Insurance contributions from your wages or occupational pension and sent to HMRC, before your employer pays you your wage or pension. Student loan repayments may also be deducted in this manner.

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How do I pay a Limited Company Pension? Guide

How do I pay a Limited Company Pension?

If you're operating as a sole trader, you can contribute to a personal pension scheme.

If you're a limited company director, you can make pension contributions as an individual (as an employee), as well as through your company (as an employer). For the latter option, your pension contributions are paid directly from your business bank account.

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What is PAYE? Guide

What is PAYE?

PAYE, or Pay As You Earn refers to a method of paying income tax and national insurance contributions.

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What do I need to do to pay a dividend? Guide

What do I need to do to pay a dividend?

To pay a dividend, you need to:

  • Hold a directors' meeting to ‚Äòdeclare' the dividend.
  • Keep minutes of the meeting, even if you're the only director. For smaller companies, this may often be just a case of getting the paperwork completed.
  • Issue dividend vouchers.
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How do I pay myself dividends? Guide

How do I pay myself dividends?

To pay a dividend, you need to:

  • Hold a directors' meeting to ‚Äòdeclare' the dividend.
  • Keep minutes of the meeting, even if you're the only director. For smaller companies, this may often be just a case of getting the paperwork completed.
  • Issue dividend vouchers.
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How do I pay myself a salary? Guide

How do I pay myself a salary?

If you're the director of a limited company, you're also considered an employee. As such, you may pay yourself a salary through the PAYE scheme-which is similar to how other employees of the company receive their pay.

You'll need to register as an employer with HMRC (even if you're only employing yourself as the sole director of a limited company), set up and run payroll, report to HMRC and abide by HMRC's record keeping requirements.

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How do I pay myself through a Limited Company? Guide

How do I pay myself through a Limited Company?

As a limited company director, you can pay yourself through:

1. Taking a salary

As the director of a limited company, you're also considered an employee. As such, any salary you draw will be paid through the PAYE scheme-similar to how other employees of the company will receive their pay.

You'll run a payroll, report to HMRC and receive your salary (after taxes have been deducted at source).

2. Dividends

A dividend is a payment of profit that a limited company distributes to its shareholders.

While dividends can be drawn at any frequency across the year-as long as there are sufficient distributable profits-payments are typically made on a monthly or quarterly basis.

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How do I pay national insurance? Guide

How do I pay national insurance?

How you pay your National Insurance contributions depends on your employment status.

If you're an employee, your National Insurance contributions are deducted from your wages before you receive your salary. Your contributions are reflected in your payslip.

If you're a limited company director, you may also be an employee (at your own company). As such, you pay Class 1 National Insurance through your PAYE payroll.

If you're self-employed, you pay Class 2 and Class 4 National Insurance depending on your profits. The majority of self-employed workers pay National Insurance through Self Assessment.

If you're employed and self-employed, your Class 1 National Insurance will be deducted through your wages. You may also need to pay Class 2 and Class 4 National Insurance depending on your self-employed profits.

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PAYE, P60's and Paying Yourself Guide Guide

PAYE, P60's and Paying Yourself Guide

  • What is PAYE
  • PAYE when self employed
  • When to register for PAYE
  • Sole trader taxes
  • Sole trader income tax calculations
  • Limited company dividends & salary
  • Dividend tax rates
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How do I change my salary? Guide

How do I change my salary?

NA

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How/ when do I pay myself Dividends? Guide

How/ when do I pay myself Dividends?

NA

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How do I pay myself when Self Employed? Guide

How do I pay myself when Self Employed?

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What are Unallocated Payments? Guide

What are Unallocated Payments?

Unallocated payments are where the client has given you more money than they owe.

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What is a Director's Salary? Guide

What is a Director's Salary?

As a limited company director, you pay yourself through drawing a salary and receiving dividends from your company.

Drawing a salary from your company is fairly similar to how you'll be paid if you were employed elsewhere-you'll run payroll, submit the required information to HMRC each month and receive your salary (after income tax and NIC have been accounted for).

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What is a PAYE Annual Return? Guide

What is a PAYE Annual Return?

The P35 is an annual tax return completed by employers. The form indicates the total tax and National Insurance contributions for each employee during the previous financial year.

With the introduction of the Real Time Information reporting (RTI), the P35 is no longer required.

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What are Directors Loans? Guide

What are Directors Loans?

A director's loan is defined as money taken from your company that isn't either of the following:

  • A salary, dividend or expense treatment
  • Money that you've previously paid into or loaned the company

A Director's Loan Account (DLA) is a record of all transactions between the company and its directors. It records not just the money owed by the directors, but also the money owed to them.

Director's loans can be used:

  • when you need to access money in your company-apart from what you take out as a salary, dividend or expense treatment-for personal reasons.
  • for a variety of purposes, such as covering the costs of a home repair bill, travel plans or any unforeseen personal expenses that may arise.
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